By clicking “Accept”, you agree to the storing of cookies on your device to enhance site navigation, analyze site usage, and assist in our marketing efforts. View our Privacy Policy for more information.

9

Updated on May 8th 2024 based on the version and article numbering in the EU Parliament's 'Corrigendum' version dated April 19th 2024.

Harmonised rules applicable to the placing on the market, the putting into service and the use of high-risk AI systems should be laid down consistently with Regulation (EC) No 765/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council7, Decision No 768/2008/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council8 and Regulation (EU) 2019/1020 of the European Parliament and of the Council9 (New Legislative Framework). The harmonised rules laid down in this Regulation should apply across sectors and, in line with the New Legislative Framework, should be without prejudice to existing Union law, in particular on data protection, consumer protection, fundamental rights, employment, and protection of workers, and product safety, to which this Regulation is complementary.

As a consequence, all rights and remedies provided for by such Union law to consumers, and other persons on whom AI systems may have a negative impact, including as regards the compensation of possible damages pursuant to Council Directive 85/374/EEC10 remain unaffected and fully applicable. Furthermore, in the context of employment and protection of workers, this Regulation should therefore not affect Union law on social policy and national labour law, in compliance with Union law, concerning employment and working conditions, including health and safety at work and the relationship between employers and workers. This Regulation should also not affect the exercise of fundamental rights as recognised in the Member States and at Union level, including the right or freedom to strike or to take other action covered by the specific industrial relations systems in Member States as well as the right to negotiate, to conclude and enforce collective agreements or to take collective action in accordance with national law.

This Regulation should not affect the provisions aiming to improve working conditions in platform work laid down in a Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on improving working conditions in platform work. Moreover, this Regulation aims to strengthen the effectiveness of such existing rights and remedies by establishing specific requirements and obligations, including in respect of the transparency, technical documentation and record-keeping of AI systems. Furthermore, the obligations placed on various operators involved in the AI value chain under this Regulation should apply without prejudice to national law, in compliance with Union law, having the effect of limiting the use of certain AI systems where such law falls outside the scope of this Regulation or pursues legitimate public interest objectives other than those pursued by this Regulation. For example, national labour law and law on the protection of minors, namely persons below the age of 18, taking into account the UNCRC General Comment No 25 (2021) on children’s rights in relation to the digital environment, insofar as they are not specific to AI systems and pursue other legitimate public interest objectives, should not be affected by this Regulation.

7Regulation (EC) No 765/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 9 July 2008 setting out the requirements for accreditation and repealing Regulation (EEC) No 339/93 (OJ L 218, 13.8.2008, p. 30).

8Decision No 768/2008/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 9 July 2008 on a common framework for the marketing of products, and repealing Council Decision 93/465/EEC (OJ L 218, 13.8.2008, p. 82).

9Regulation (EU) 2019/1020 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 June 2019 on market surveillance and compliance of products and amending Directive 2004/42/EC and Regulations (EC) No 765/2008 and (EU) No 305/2011 (OJ L 169, 25.6.2019, p. 1).

10Council Directive 85/374/EEC of 25 July 1985 on the approximation of the laws, regulations and administrative provisions of the Member States concerning liability for defective products (OJ L 210, 7.8.1985, p. 29).

[Previous version]

Updated on April 10th 2024 based on the version and article numbering approved by the EU Parliament on March 13th 2024.

Harmonised rules applicable to the placing on the market, the putting into service and the use of high-risk AI systems should be laid down consistently with Regulation (EC) No 765/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council7, Decision No 768/2008/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council8 and Regulation (EU) 2019/1020 of the European Parliament and of the Council9 (‘New Legislative Framework’). The harmonised rules laid down in this Regulation should apply across sectors and, in line with the New Legislative Framework, should be without prejudice to existing Union law, in particular on data protection, consumer protection, fundamental rights, employment, and protection of workers, and product safety, to which this Regulation is complementary.

As a consequence all rights and remedies provided for by such Union law to consumers, and other persons on whom AI systems may have a negative impact, including as regards the compensation of possible damages pursuant to Council Directive 85/374/EEC10 remain unaffected and fully applicable. Furthermore, in the context of employment and protection of workers, this Regulation should therefore not affect Union law on social policy and national labour law, in accordance with Union law, concerning employment and working conditions, including health and safety at work and the relationship between employers and workers. This Regulation should also not affect the exercise of fundamental rights as recognised in the Member States and at Union level, including the right or freedom to strike or to take other action covered by the specific industrial relations systems in Member States as well as the right to negotiate, to conclude and enforce collective agreements or to take collective action in accordance with national law.

This Regulation should not affect the provisions aiming to improve working conditions in platform work laid down in Directive (EU) 2024/… of the European Parliament and of the Council11+. Moreover, this Regulation aims to strengthen the effectiveness of such existing rights and remedies by establishing specific requirements and obligations, including in respect of transparency, technical documentation and record-keeping of AI systems. Furthermore, the obligations placed on various operators involved in the AI value chain under this Regulation should apply without prejudice to national law, in accordance with Union law, having the effect of limiting the use of certain AI systems where such law falls outside the scope of this Regulation or pursues other legitimate public interest objectives than those pursued by this Regulation. For example, national labour law and law on the protection of minors, namely persons below the age of 18, taking into account the United Nations General Comment No 25 (2021) on children’s rights in relation to the digital environment, insofar as they are not specific to AI systems and pursue other legitimate public interest objectives, should not be affected by this Regulation.

7Regulation (EC) No 765/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 9 July 2008 setting out the requirements for accreditation and market surveillance relating to the marketing of products and repealing Regulation (EEC) No 339/93 (OJ L 218, 13.8.2008, p. 30).

8Decision No 768/2008/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 9 July 2008 on a common framework for the marketing of products, and repealing Council Decision 93/465/EEC (OJ L 218, 13.8.2008, p. 82).

9Regulation (EU) 2019/1020 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 June 2019 on market surveillance and compliance of products and amending Directive 2004/42/EC and Regulations (EC) No 765/2008 and (EU) No 305/2011 (Text with EEA relevance) (OJ L 169, 25.6.2019, p. 1–44).

10CouncilDirective 85/374/EEC of 25 July 1985 on the approximation of the laws,regulations and administrative provisions of the Member Statesconcerning liability for defective products (OJ L 210,7.8.1985, p. 29).

11Directive (EU) 2024/… of the European Parliament and of the Council of … on improving working conditions in platform work (OJ L, …, ELI: …).

+OJ: please, insert in the text the number of the Directive in PE XX/YY (2021/0414(COD)) and complete the corresponding footnote.

Updated on Feb 6th 2024 based on the version endorsed by the Coreper I on Feb 2nd

For the purposes of this Regulation the notion of publicly accessible space should be understood as referring to any physical place that is accessible to an undetermined number of natural persons, and irrespective of whether the place in question is privately or publicly owned and irrespective of the activity for which the place may be used, such as commerce (for instance, shops, restaurants, cafés), services (for instance, banks, professional activities, hospitality), sport (for instance, swimming pools, gyms, stadiums), transport (for instance, bus, metro and railway stations, airports, means of transport ), entertainment (for instance, cinemas, theatres, museums, concert and conference halls) leisure or otherwise (for instance, public roads and squares, parks, forests, playgrounds). A place should be classified as publicly accessible also if, regardless of potential capacity or security restrictions, access is subject to certain predetermined conditions, which can be fulfilled by an undetermined number of persons, such as purchase of a ticket or title of transport, prior registration or having a certain age. By contrast, a place should not be considered publicly accessible if access is limited to specific and defined natural persons through either Union or national law directly related to public safety or security or through the clear manifestation of will by the person having the relevant authority on the place. The factual possibility of access alone (e.g. an unlocked door, an open gate in a fence) does not imply that the place is publicly accessible in the presence of indications or circumstances suggesting the contrary (e.g. signs prohibiting or restricting access). Company and factory premises as well as offices and workplaces that are intended to be accessed only by relevant employees and service providers are places that are not publicly accessible.

Publicly accessible spaces should not include prisons or border control. Some other areas may be composed of both not publicly accessible and publicly accessible areas, such as the hallway of a private residential building necessary to access a doctor's office or an airport. Online spaces are not covered either, as they are not physical spaces. Whether a given space is accessible to the public should however be determined on a case-by-case basis, having regard to the specificities of the individual situation at hand.

Report error

Report error

Please keep in mind that this form is only for feedback and suggestions for improvement.

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.